facebook-TNI Teléfono-TNI Whatsapp-TNI Registro-TNI
=
  • Главная
  • Введение
  • Продукция
  • ЧаВо
  • Контакты
  • Видео
  • ЧаВо

    Главная

    >>

    ЧаВо

    >>

    Compatibility

  • Application
  • Efficacy
  • Compatibility
  • Durability
  • Quality
  • Safety
  • Application
  • Efficacy
  • Compatibility
  • Durability
  • Quality
  • Safety
  • Там никаких доступных переводов

    Микроогранизмы, лечащие корни:

    Микоризные грибы, триходерма лигнорум и полезные бактерии (PGPR)

    Этот раздел дает ответы на часто задаваемые вопросы о применении, эффективности, совместимости, выносливости, качестве и безопаFRESA

    Are our microorganisms compatible with chemical products?

    The recommendations for the use of biological products should contain a compatibility list that informs about the interactions with chemical plant protection products and fertilizers. This is especially true when employed as a tool of integrated crop management and in the gradual process of conversion from chemical to biological management.

    The beneficial fungi contained in our products are usually compatible with insecticides, herbicides, antibiotics, and even a great number of fungicides. Sometimes fungicides cause a slight growth inhibition. For example, a fungicide might reduce the success of the colonization by our strain of the endomycorrhizal fungus Glomus intraradices. We define the fungicide as compatible as long as it does not cause the mycorrhization of the roots to fall below 80% of its normal value.

    High phosphate concentrations (>40ppm in a nutrient solution) can slow down the colonization process by the mycorrhizal fungi to the extent that there is no colonization within the narrow time frame of plant production. Some crops, such as weed, respond to mycorrhization with higher than normal yields only after halving the phosphate input.

    The beneficial bacteria contained in our products usually tolerate insecticides, herbicides, and fungicides but must not be combined with antibiotics.

    As a general recommendation, bacterial and fungal spores should not be mixed with plant protection products and fertilizers in the same tank. Special caution must be taken when using broad spectrum antimicrobial biocides, such as chlorine and hydrogen peroxide.

    Which cultural practices have to be adjusted when using microorganisms?

    We pursue the aim of an integrated crop management with an ever more complete use of new microbiological elements within the solid framework of conventional cultural practices. Our products can be applied alongside the vast majority of chemical products, with the exception of antimicrobials and some few chemical fungicides. This allows for their step-by-step introduction without the total abolishment of other products or cultural practices.

    Our long term goal is to replace chemical products as completely as possible by biological alternatives. We are delighted by every client who becomes so convinced by the protective properties of the microorganisms in the product BactivaTM as to suspend the use of chemical fungicides against root rot altogether.

    Our advisers assist in this incremental buildup of trust through a respectful relationship. We know that the shift from conventional practices to biological crop management always includes a shared learning curve. In the process we value years of experience and mistrust radical “solutions”.

    Recommended practices

    Cultural practices that improve soil ecology may not be a must but they are still advisable because they contribute to the formation of humus and suppress the proliferation of pathogens. This is especially true for the use of organic material and biostimulants that boost soil live (e.g.: compost, worm compost, fish extract, humic acids and fulvic acids, sea kelp extract). It also includes less tilling or even zero tillage, the use of suitable planting densities and crop rotation in summer and winter. The fertilizer program should be adapted to the results of up-to-date chemical analysis that also includes microelements and continuous measurements of pH values and electric conductivity. Our technical assistance encompasses all of these biological, chemical and organic components.

    Which plants profit from the use of our microorganisms?

    The roots of all plants are associated with beneficial microorganisms. Our product BactivaTM can be employed successfully with all crops. Even the roots of epiphytes, such as ornamental orchids, are widely treated with BactivaTM. The only exceptions are aquatic plants for which our microorganisms are not suited.

    The products BactivaTM, EndosporTM and EctosporTM have been applied primarily and on a commercial scale to the following crops:

  • Vegetables and fruits: tomato, chili, potato, lettuce, cucumber, strawberry, blackberry, raspberry, water melon...
  • Legumes: bean, pea, soya, broad bean, chickpea, peanut...
  • Grain and corn: corn, wheat, barley, millet...
  • Ornamentals: poinsettia, rose, cut flowers…
  • Forest / fruit trees: pine, oak, peach, avocado, walnut…
  • Cash crops: sugar cane, cotton, oil palm...
  • Green areas: golf courses, sports facilities, urban parks…
  • Mycorrhiza

    Some plants do not associate with mycorrhizae. These include mainly members of the cabbage family (Brassicaceae), knotweed family (Polygonaceae), pink family (Caryophyllaceae), fat-leafed plants (Crassulaceae) and Chenopodiaceae, as well as many aquatic plants or plants that are associated with water, such as the sedges (Cyperaceae) and rushes (Juncaceae), and specific plant families, including carnivorous plants and parasites.

    These plants cannot be treated with EndosporTM. However, they can be successfully inoculated with BactivaTM (with the exception of aquatic plants).

    In addition, different types of plants require distinct mycorrhizal fungi. They are commonly divided into mycorrhizal types, each of which is being formed by different fungal genera (ectomycorrhizas, ectendo-mycorhizas, arbutoid mycorrhizas, ericoid mycorrhizas, VA mycorrhizas, orchid mycorrhizas, and monotropoid mycorrhizas).

    By far the most common form is the VA mycorrhiza (VA = vesicular-abuscular). It is formed mainly by fungi of the genus Glomus which is the main ingredient of the product EndosporTM...

    The most commonly used product in forestry is EctosporTM. It contains the ectomycorrhizal fungi Pisolithus and Rhizopogon. These fungi colonize the roots of all conifers and deciduous trees of the birch (Betulaceae), beech (Fagaceae), and willow family (Salicaceae).

    Is it possible to apply Trichoderma and bacteria such as Bacillus subtilis mixed together?

    The topic is subject to extensive debates by experts. Our experience so far has shown that Trichoderma and Bacillus subtilis can indeed occasionally harm each other through competition, antagonism, or even parasitism. However, these rare and generally weak negative interactions are more than compensated by the numerous advantages that come with a complex mixture. The combination of several highly active species in our products increases the probabilities of success and their potential for applications in different crops and a wide range of environmental conditions and production systems.

    Is it possible to combine different products that contain microorganisms?

    The ecological balance of a natural species community becomes more stable with an increasing number of participating species and strains. This rule also applies to the living community of the soil and the immediate sphere of influence of the roots, the rhizosphere. Here it is an ecologically stable, species-rich community of microorganisms that helps the plant to thrive even in poor conditions.

    However, the microorganisms of two or more commercial products might occasionally interact with each other antagonistically when combined. It is conceivable, for example, that a strongly dominant but not very effective nitrogen fixer displaces the less dominant but more productive nitrogen fixer of another product altogether.

    To avoid this risk, only products should be combined that complement each other. Each product should also have shown its efficacy as a stand-alone product. In this case a combination of several products should yield superior results than a single product.

    Can microorganisms be combined with all substrates?

    Each species can only live, grow and reproduce within a certain range of environmental conditions. This so-called ecological amplitude is usually wider for our microorganisms that colonize the roots than for their host plants, i.e., they can tolerate a larger variation in environmental conditions, such as temperature, altitude, acidity and availability of water. Crucially, the plants ability to withstand extreme pH values and temperatures or a lack of water also increases through under the influence of the microorganisms. Thus microorganisms widen a plant’s ecological amplitude by its buffering effect on extreme environments.

    This finding answers a series of questions regarding the demands of microorganisms. Good growing conditions for plants are also beneficial for the microorganisms contained in our products. Consequently, microorganisms can be combined with all plant substrates.

    However, the suitability of a substrate or a solution as a carrier for microorganisms that are stored for some time before being applied to crops, has to be confirmed on a case-by-case basis through laboratory tests.

    Mixing our endomycorrhizal fungi with compost and storing the blend for a few weeks before use results in unsatisfactory levels of colonization on plant roots in three-quarters of the cases. However, this observation masks large and hard to explain differences between different types of compost.

    At a sufficient level of freely available water saprophytic microorganisms, such as Bacillus and Trichoderma¸ can germinate and colonize the entire potting mix or soil. This results in a positive head start. However, such a population can collapse again when stored for too much time.

    =

    ЧаВо

    Там никаких доступных переводов

    Микроогранизмы, лечащие корни:

    Микоризные грибы, триходерма лигнорум и полезные бактерии (PGPR)

    Этот раздел дает ответы на часто задаваемые вопросы о применении, эффективности, совместимости, выносливости, качестве и безопаFRESA

    Are our microorganisms compatible with chemical products?

    The recommendations for the use of biological products should contain a compatibility list that informs about the interactions with chemical plant protection products and fertilizers. This is especially true when employed as a tool of integrated crop management and in the gradual process of conversion from chemical to biological management.

    The beneficial fungi contained in our products are usually compatible with insecticides, herbicides, antibiotics, and even a great number of fungicides. Sometimes fungicides cause a slight growth inhibition. For example, a fungicide might reduce the success of the colonization by our strain of the endomycorrhizal fungus Glomus intraradices. We define the fungicide as compatible as long as it does not cause the mycorrhization of the roots to fall below 80% of its normal value.

    High phosphate concentrations (>40ppm in a nutrient solution) can slow down the colonization process by the mycorrhizal fungi to the extent that there is no colonization within the narrow time frame of plant production. Some crops, such as weed, respond to mycorrhization with higher than normal yields only after halving the phosphate input.

    The beneficial bacteria contained in our products usually tolerate insecticides, herbicides, and fungicides but must not be combined with antibiotics.

    As a general recommendation, bacterial and fungal spores should not be mixed with plant protection products and fertilizers in the same tank. Special caution must be taken when using broad spectrum antimicrobial biocides, such as chlorine and hydrogen peroxide.

    Which cultural practices have to be adjusted when using microorganisms?

    We pursue the aim of an integrated crop management with an ever more complete use of new microbiological elements within the solid framework of conventional cultural practices. Our products can be applied alongside the vast majority of chemical products, with the exception of antimicrobials and some few chemical fungicides. This allows for their step-by-step introduction without the total abolishment of other products or cultural practices.

    Our long term goal is to replace chemical products as completely as possible by biological alternatives. We are delighted by every client who becomes so convinced by the protective properties of the microorganisms in the product BactivaTM as to suspend the use of chemical fungicides against root rot altogether.

    Our advisers assist in this incremental buildup of trust through a respectful relationship. We know that the shift from conventional practices to biological crop management always includes a shared learning curve. In the process we value years of experience and mistrust radical “solutions”.

    Recommended practices

    Cultural practices that improve soil ecology may not be a must but they are still advisable because they contribute to the formation of humus and suppress the proliferation of pathogens. This is especially true for the use of organic material and biostimulants that boost soil live (e.g.: compost, worm compost, fish extract, humic acids and fulvic acids, sea kelp extract). It also includes less tilling or even zero tillage, the use of suitable planting densities and crop rotation in summer and winter. The fertilizer program should be adapted to the results of up-to-date chemical analysis that also includes microelements and continuous measurements of pH values and electric conductivity. Our technical assistance encompasses all of these biological, chemical and organic components.

    Which plants profit from the use of our microorganisms?

    The roots of all plants are associated with beneficial microorganisms. Our product BactivaTM can be employed successfully with all crops. Even the roots of epiphytes, such as ornamental orchids, are widely treated with BactivaTM. The only exceptions are aquatic plants for which our microorganisms are not suited.

    The products BactivaTM, EndosporTM and EctosporTM have been applied primarily and on a commercial scale to the following crops:

  • Vegetables and fruits: tomato, chili, potato, lettuce, cucumber, strawberry, blackberry, raspberry, water melon...
  • Legumes: bean, pea, soya, broad bean, chickpea, peanut...
  • Grain and corn: corn, wheat, barley, millet...
  • Ornamentals: poinsettia, rose, cut flowers…
  • Forest / fruit trees: pine, oak, peach, avocado, walnut…
  • Cash crops: sugar cane, cotton, oil palm...
  • Green areas: golf courses, sports facilities, urban parks…
  • Mycorrhiza

    Some plants do not associate with mycorrhizae. These include mainly members of the cabbage family (Brassicaceae), knotweed family (Polygonaceae), pink family (Caryophyllaceae), fat-leafed plants (Crassulaceae) and Chenopodiaceae, as well as many aquatic plants or plants that are associated with water, such as the sedges (Cyperaceae) and rushes (Juncaceae), and specific plant families, including carnivorous plants and parasites.

    These plants cannot be treated with EndosporTM. However, they can be successfully inoculated with BactivaTM (with the exception of aquatic plants).

    In addition, different types of plants require distinct mycorrhizal fungi. They are commonly divided into mycorrhizal types, each of which is being formed by different fungal genera (ectomycorrhizas, ectendo-mycorhizas, arbutoid mycorrhizas, ericoid mycorrhizas, VA mycorrhizas, orchid mycorrhizas, and monotropoid mycorrhizas).

    By far the most common form is the VA mycorrhiza (VA = vesicular-abuscular). It is formed mainly by fungi of the genus Glomus which is the main ingredient of the product EndosporTM...

    The most commonly used product in forestry is EctosporTM. It contains the ectomycorrhizal fungi Pisolithus and Rhizopogon. These fungi colonize the roots of all conifers and deciduous trees of the birch (Betulaceae), beech (Fagaceae), and willow family (Salicaceae).

    Is it possible to apply Trichoderma and bacteria such as Bacillus subtilis mixed together?

    The topic is subject to extensive debates by experts. Our experience so far has shown that Trichoderma and Bacillus subtilis can indeed occasionally harm each other through competition, antagonism, or even parasitism. However, these rare and generally weak negative interactions are more than compensated by the numerous advantages that come with a complex mixture. The combination of several highly active species in our products increases the probabilities of success and their potential for applications in different crops and a wide range of environmental conditions and production systems.

    Is it possible to combine different products that contain microorganisms?

    The ecological balance of a natural species community becomes more stable with an increasing number of participating species and strains. This rule also applies to the living community of the soil and the immediate sphere of influence of the roots, the rhizosphere. Here it is an ecologically stable, species-rich community of microorganisms that helps the plant to thrive even in poor conditions.

    However, the microorganisms of two or more commercial products might occasionally interact with each other antagonistically when combined. It is conceivable, for example, that a strongly dominant but not very effective nitrogen fixer displaces the less dominant but more productive nitrogen fixer of another product altogether.

    To avoid this risk, only products should be combined that complement each other. Each product should also have shown its efficacy as a stand-alone product. In this case a combination of several products should yield superior results than a single product.

    Can microorganisms be combined with all substrates?

    Each species can only live, grow and reproduce within a certain range of environmental conditions. This so-called ecological amplitude is usually wider for our microorganisms that colonize the roots than for their host plants, i.e., they can tolerate a larger variation in environmental conditions, such as temperature, altitude, acidity and availability of water. Crucially, the plants ability to withstand extreme pH values and temperatures or a lack of water also increases through under the influence of the microorganisms. Thus microorganisms widen a plant’s ecological amplitude by its buffering effect on extreme environments.

    This finding answers a series of questions regarding the demands of microorganisms. Good growing conditions for plants are also beneficial for the microorganisms contained in our products. Consequently, microorganisms can be combined with all plant substrates.

    However, the suitability of a substrate or a solution as a carrier for microorganisms that are stored for some time before being applied to crops, has to be confirmed on a case-by-case basis through laboratory tests.

    Mixing our endomycorrhizal fungi with compost and storing the blend for a few weeks before use results in unsatisfactory levels of colonization on plant roots in three-quarters of the cases. However, this observation masks large and hard to explain differences between different types of compost.

    At a sufficient level of freely available water saprophytic microorganisms, such as Bacillus and Trichoderma¸ can germinate and colonize the entire potting mix or soil. This results in a positive head start. However, such a population can collapse again when stored for too much time.